InSight (45)

InSight

I thought I was done and dusted with the Canyons of My Mind series but no, my subconscious had another surprise in store for me – a nightmare!

I’ve only, thankfully, had one other nightmare in my life, when a Dementor (a monstrous being in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling) appeared and, I can assure you, I hope I never see another Dementor in my life!

I dithered about writing about this nightmare as it took a while to work out and also it has a rather unpleasant content – at least, until the end. But it seems to me it’s an example of healing at a very great depth which may be encouraging to others who may experience something similar.

So here goes.

“In the dream I am back in the house where I lived as a kid, Liverpool Lawn in Ramsgate, Kent, south-east England.  I go into a room where my father is asleep but he wakes up as I enter and walks threateningly towards me, a real monster. I realise he intends to rape me and I am absolutely terrified.  I run out of the house, with him in relentless pursuit and it is pitch-black outside. I then run frantically down the alley way which used to run between Liverpool Lawn and Adelaide Gardens. All these houses had semi-basements and I am absolutely terrified as I run along.

Then I see a light on in one of the basements, run down the steps and burst into the house through the back door. I shut the door and find myself facing a young couple looking somewhat alarmed (as you do, I suppose when someone bursts into your house unexpectedly). I tell them my father is following me and intends to rape me, they say they’ll help but then we all suddenly realise he’s gone around the front of the terraced houses and is outside the front door.

The young man looks outside, says that my father now has a gun, and goes outside to confront him. However, I can’t let the young man be harmed so run out and push past my father. As I run around the centre lawn and arrive at the other side, I come across people at an outside party who, when I tell them my story, advise me to tell the police who have a branch office in one of the houses on the crescent.

I run up to the police post, ring the bell and tell my story when the policeman answers the door. He tells me I’m imagining things and to go home and stop dramatising things. But then I realise I can hear my father and his parents upstairs being warmly received by the police. I am furious and enraged, rather than scared, shout at the policeman for not doing his job, and run upstairs to confront my father and my paternal grandparents.”

When I woke up straight after the dream, I felt so terrified I got up and had a cup of coffee until I’d calmed down enough to return to bed and get back to sleep without worrying about the dream recurring. It’s my belief that, when we have a powerful dream/nightmare which affects us deeply, it’s important to find out what it’s about as the dream/nightmare has significance in your life.

I must say, upfront, that in fairness to my father, I’m pretty sure that he never sexually abused me. I know there are many instances of repressed memories but it was emotional, mental and physical control which characterised my relationship with my father.

If you look at the nightmare, it divides into three: 1) running away   2) seeking refuge  3) finally deciding to stop running, stand up for myself and overcome the fear (if you are trying to analyse a dream, look at how it breaks up. You’ll generally find a new section begins “And then….”).

I also think that the inclusion of my grandparents – with whom I had a distant relationship once my aunt, the favourite, had a daughter and replaced me – is also about ancestral healing, perhaps again because I felt I’d been also on approval with my grandparents and discarded as soon as my cousin was born.

It seems to me, the fear and terror represents what I felt as a child with the episode which I described in an earlier post and which left me believing I was in my family on approval, so to speak, with that approval liable to be removed any time. Of course, this wasn’t the true situation – this was my perspective as a child.  It also represents the fact that I’ve been running from these feelings for a lot of my life.

I found the middle bit a bit hard to understand, until I realised that both the young man and woman were aspects of myself – the immature beings which, in my life, have been represented by my desire for approval and to be liked which, quite often, have led to me appeasing others at my own expense, fudging the truth, putting on a friendly face when I felt quite hurt by what people had said.

And finally, standing up to the police, my father and my grandparents is the position I’m in now – one where I’ve cleared out the old fears and childhood insecurity, and asserted my ability to be a powerful force for myself, for my creativity and for my self-confidence and self-esteem.

I should add that, since I completed writing about my childhood and since that nightmare, I am far more laid back, far less driven and far more ready to honour myself as a worthy, loveable human being who approves of and stands up for herself.

If anyone has any additional ideas about my nightmare, please feel free to contribute your thoughts, I’m more than happy to build up a collective understanding of my nightmare/dream as I feel it helps others in understanding their own dreams.

Oh, and just as an afterthought, my eating patterns have stabilised and I’ve started losing weight!

 

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9 responses

  1. it’s interesting that this dreams follows your recent success at the art fair. your father sounds like he was oppressive, as do authority “officials, who serve the “good of the people.” and yet… you are Mo, the healer, the tarot reader, the creator of an art form no one before you could have imagined… and that’s pretty non-traditional, altogether. Kind of out of the realm of proper authority.

    And you are a master. Seems your dream celebrates you all the way down the hall.

    Like

    1. What a lovely comment, Meredith! It’s interesting that people can look on from the outside and get a perspective which you miss when you’re personally involved. Thank you so much.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I thought I’d replied to this, but perhaps not. Thank for such a great comment, it is spot on, so much so, that I’m creating a piece of digital art with your words to put up on the wall in front of my computer. Thank you again.

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      1. Actually, Mo, you did reply; I felt very embarrassed for having jumped into your post. I’m glad it was all right to have shared the thought. The art pieces you posted were very compelling, and I wanted to learn what inspired such… well, they’re very powerful, and the third one really startled me so I was glad you shared more about how the art came into being.

        You have an amazing richness of presence. You’re very gifted in your craft. Truly multi-dimensional in expression.

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      2. Don’t be embarrassed, Meredith, I thought your comments wer amazingly insightful. I’ve printed them out and they’re going up on my wall. What I like is that people can look at what you’re doing from the outside and see aspects you wouldn’t see yourself. Which is why I appreciate your comments so much. I got the feeling that this is something you could follow through as a practice as you have good insight and could help people so much. You’ve certainly helped me! Thank you!!!

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  2. Thank you, Mo. Welcome to that other side
    Hallelujah!

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    1. Thanks, Rita, Aboriginal people talk of “welcome to Country” when welcoming people to Aboriginal land – land which covers the whole of Australia. And now I reckon I’ve come home to “My Country” and joying the feeling of peace and being at ease with myself. My soul and spirit are rejoicing!

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  3. Stunning painting and great story!

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    1. Thank you so much. Blessings to you xx

      Like

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