Some Book References on Food

I did a short swing into Thailand in my previous post and decided I’d like to keep writing for a while about places I’ve visited, so instead of ranting and raving about diets, food, size and so on, I decided I’d just publish the names of books I’ve found interesting.

The reality is we all have to work out what sort of food and eating habits suit each of us. I’ve avoided the dreaded word “diet” because it implies losing weight and eating naff food and all the horrors associated with a food regime which will likely leave us hungry, unhappy and piling on the weight when we return to normal food.

Like I’ve said, I know emotional influences surround my relationship with food and weight, and I wonder if the fact that so many people are overweight these days (as in seriously overweight, not overweight by the BMI shonky weight formula) is because of the pressures people are under today with long hours, poverty wages, unemployment, fast-paced society and so on.

After all, if you’re feeling stressed, what better way to make yourself feel good than to splurge on food you love in excess quantities. The trick is to eat the food you love in reasonable quantities and make good choices. But aaahhh! if food choices were that easy, we’d all know exactly what our bodies would like, we’d stop eating when we feel less than full, and we’d choose food we like, not food we feel morally bound to eat and avoid food we feel morally bound NOT to eat!

Every man, woman and their dog has an idea of what the best way to eat is and what food is good and what isn’t. Be your own detective: tune into how you feel about particular foods, when do you feel good after eating, when do you feel slow and tired, and so on. Sort out what food suits you!

Be that as it may, these books have been very helpful to me, they dismantle myths about obesity and the great “eatBe Yourself your carbohydrates” brain-washing which has permeated our society to the point of being mythologised and worshipped, and interestingly, the writers aren’t part of the diet/nutritional/pharmaceutical/medico in-crowd (with apologies to some doctors who I know are pretty decent people!).

Here goes:

The Obesity Myth – Paul Campos

The Big Fat Surprise – Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet – Nina Teicholz

Why Diets Fail (because You’re Addicted to Sugar) – Nicole E. Avena

Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants – How the Food Giants Hooked Us – Michael Moss

Why We Get Fat – Gary Taubes

Health at Every Size – Linda Bacon

The Unapologetic Fat Girl’s Guide to Exercise and other Incendiary Acts – Hanne Blank

Intuitive Eating – Evelyn Tribole & Elyse Resch

However, I have to say that I am not a fan of the size acceptance which says if you are really, really fat, that’s okay. I respect people whatever their size and I really loathe the fact that if you’re fat you’re automatically considered fat/lazy/stupid/lack control/greedy and so on.  People are worthy of respect and consideration whatever their size.

But I have seen some very, very fat people in Australia, the UK and particularly the US, and the truth is that our bodies are not meant to carry super-weight.  I differentiate this from what is called “overweight” these days and which I call “normal” because I Iived in earlier times when there was a far more realistic approach to what our size should be.

As you get older, your body will find it hard to carry severe, excess weight. Simple fact. Sort out what is healthy for you and get your own agenda, but if your body feels uncomfortable at the weight you’re carrying, then it’s a nudge to you to work out how to get fit and healthy.  But don’t be dissatisfied with your body if it doesn’t fit the “thin” stereotype you see these days. Along the way you may lose weight, but don’t focus on weight – focus on the fit and healthy part because that’s by far the healthiest way to look after yourself. Like I said, ditch the “thin is good” stereotype, take a good look at your body, and decide what is right for you.

Good luck!

 

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5 responses

  1. Oh Mo…This today when I feel better than ever but the scale and my clothes say I’m bigger! Thanks for this post! ❤

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    1. Glad the post helped!

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  2. That was a really great way of summing up a topic that can easily get complicated. I think it boils down to common sense and listening to your own body. It is really hard to turn a deaf ear to all the ‘expert advice’, ‘magic pills’ and marketing clamor.

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    1. I was actually intending to a long rant but then thought it was inappropriate – what’s right for me isn’t right for someone else. Which is why I went the multi-choice path!

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      1. Good thinking! Lol. My comment started out much longer as well.

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